Arthur September 20, 1988  [Trent University student newspaper]

Expressive, Joe, Satirical, Rich

Joe Lewis is no stranger to Peterborough. In fact, to most, he is a local folk hero, like most folk heroes, Lewis is not without controversy. This is not surprising since Lewis’ pioneering approach to life and art’ (let this be one of those vague statements about aesthetics that 1 don’t feet like unpacking at the moment) has often placed him in the midst of scandalous, but delightful debates.

Lewis is perhaps most remembered by the flurry of letters in the Arthur last year, accusing his work, which hangs in the TSU office, of obscene content. Opinions about obscenity aside, although it is always interesting to know what offends people, Lewis’ present work is definitely growing in new directions.

At a recent showing of Lewis’ latest work, at the Broadview Gallery, nothing was more evident than the new form his work is taking. Lewis is moving away from his cartoon drawings. He is also not incorporating as much text in his art as earlier works.

As always Lewis’ work is still distinctive. His art is stilt expressive and satirical There seems, however, to be much more anxiety moving through his canvasses. Lewis fills his canvas with solid colours. Ills brush strokes are ld, suggesting as much determination and effort with the medium as with his content.

Lewis is rediscovering painting and finding out all the ways that colour, expression and images can work together.

 

 

photo by Gord Thompson

Perhaps this is one reason why he is moving away from heavy text in his work.

Lewis never just presents an image without commentary or criticism. Since he is using more images and more colours to express his feelings and ideas his work seems overall denser, Lewis is building a history. His work becomes more layered, his political imagery becomes more poignant and his work becomes

Lisa Lowe

 

 

Photos from the opening night at the New Works show at Broadview Gallery.

Top: me reading poetry from “And I Do Sing” (synk INK 1987)

Bev Johns standing by her portrait and Detail

David Bateman, Liza Low (reviewer) Myself

Self Portrait (detail)

 

 

 

 

 

 

PS Moore and Cave Barbie

 

Maurine Dmytryshyn and Andra McCarthy with my self Portrait

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